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[Place Names of Hawai'i]
Ka-huku

Land sections, Honomū qd.; ranch, Honu-ʻapo qd., Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi. Ka-huku Pali is a fault scarp 2.5 miles northwest of South Point; it has a maximum height of about 600 feet, extends inland about 10 miles, and can be traced out to sea 18 miles (Macdonald and Abbott 41). In Kaʻū two young chiefs raced with Pele on hōlua sleds but became afraid and refused to race with her when they discovered who she was; Pele chased them, devastating the once fertile area and creating Nā-puʻu-a-Pele (the hills of Pele). (Westervelt, 1963:23–26.) Village, land division, northernmost point, golf course, ranch, schools, forest reserve, and surfing beach (Finney, 1959a:108), Oʻahu. The point here was cut off from the island by Lono-ka-ʻeho (Lono the stone), a chief with eight stone foreheads (see Ka-lae-o-Kahipa). A lone rock here, Kū's Rock Spring, was said to give forth pure spring water (Sterling and Summers 4:53; see Wai-pahu). Oʻahu was believed to have consisted of two islands ruled by a brother and sister who locked fingers to pull the islands together. They did this at a pool called Pō-lou, perhaps a shortening of Pou-lou (hooked post). (Sterling and Summers 4:49–50a.) Lit., the projection.

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Hawaiian Dictionary (Pukui/Elbert dictionary) Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawaiʻi Press,
Māmaka Kaiao Copyright © 2003 by ʻAha Pūnana Leo and Hale Kuamoʻo,
Place Names of Hawaiʻi (Pukui/Elbert/Mookini) Copyright © 1974, 2004 by University of Hawaiʻi Press,
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